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LSD and Weather Control: A Century of R&D in the U.S. Military

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LSD and Weather Control: A Century of R&D in the U.S. Military

popular scienceOn Sept 9th, 2010, Popular Science (PopSci) posted a gallery of “The Twentieth Century?s Best-Kept Military Secrets.” The gallery contains 11 different projects that span the 20th century. These projects have become defunct or less secret over the years while others are still active and shrouded in mystery.

During the 1960s, a counter-culture emerged based on breaking the social taboos in sexism, racism, and recreational drug use. However, it was not only bored housewives or rebellious teens participating in this new revolution; our military was as well. One aspect of the 1960s counter-culture that caught the military?s eye was alternative uses for recreational drugs.





lsd

The January 1960 issue of Popular Science, reported that the U.S. military was experimenting with ?Loony Gas.? Loony gas was going to change the way wars were fought. Loony gas was actually LSD, a known hallucinogenic agent. The idea was to expose entire towns or areas with the LSD-based concoction, usually in the form of a gas that was delivered by missiles. Then, while the residents were incapacitated, our soldiers could simply walk in and take over with barely lifting a finger.

Eventually, the project was scrapped. This is likely because LSD has some serious side effects. Maybe the military thought it would not be so easy to take over a town that was having a ?bad trip.?

Another military project is HAARP. HAARP, meaning High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program, is still active today and shrouded in mystery. Officially, it is a collaborative program funded by various military departments and the University of Alaska to conduct ionospheric research. This type of research focuses on the uppermost part of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation.

However, the September 1995 issue of PopSci, reported that HAARP may have an ulterior motive. This motive is to pursue research of a more militaristic nature. Research that borders more on science fiction; such as, controlling the weather in enemy territories. Their claims of these motives are based on internal documents that PopSci received in 1990. The nature of the research coupled with the discrepancy in the program?s true agenda makes it a perfect target for conspiracy theorists and science junkies alike.

If you fall into either category, conspiracy theorist or science junky, then definitely check out PopSci?s gallery about these and other best-kept military secrets of the 20th century.

Originally published on TopSecretWriters.com

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