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The Star Gate Remote Viewing Project – Part II

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The Star Gate Remote Viewing Project – Part II

remote viewingEditor’s Note: This article is part II of this two part series on the Top Secret remote viewing project. If you haven’t read it yet, make sure to check out part I. In part II below, Daz covers the rest of the remote viewing program’s demise, and the state of the remote viewing community today.

Ed Dames and others from the secret project were already active in the public domain selling promises of remote viewing services, using their intel and army-taught skills in the public sector.

Ed Dames had formed a private company to do just this in 1989 and had various ex-remote viewers and military/intel staff from the military unit involved in his company called Psi-Tech. As far back as 1992, Ed Dames was selling his wares at UFO conferences with descriptions of what remote viewing could achieve and hints of what had been done with it in the military.




remote viewer

Books and Documentaries Threaten Program Security

In 1993, Ed Dames and David Morehouse (participants in the military remote viewing program) were in the throes of retelling their military remote viewing story in book form with Jim Marrs. Throughout 1993-4 Jim Marrs was making the rounds with his research of the book, ringing people involved in the project and asking a lot of questions – most of the answers were still secrets.

The book didn’t make it to press due to conflicts between Morehouse and Dames over who would be the focus and hero of the story in the book. Marrs claims that the book was stopped by CIA interference. Later it was published in reduced form by Marrs as ‘Psi spies’ in 2000.

Not long after this (1994) David Morehouse was involved in his own troubles. He was due to be court marshaled due to allegations of theft of a computer and in having an affair with an enlisted man’s wife. David Morehouse was admitted to Walter Reed Psychiatric Ward after an attempted suicide bid.

By now, 60 minutes caught onto the story and were going to do an expose on the entire program. They had talked to Ingo Swann and had also interviewed Morehouse at Walter Reed. Paul Smith, an ex military remote viewer, found out about the looming expose and rang around warning everyone that he could.

David Morehouse was offered and accepted an ‘other than honorable’ discharge. I suspect that the discharge was an attempt to quiet the growing story. Paul Smith’s frantic phonecalls seem to have worked – the leaks temporarily dried-up and the 60 Minutes program never aired.

But this wasn’t the only assault.

Other Disclosures

At the same time, one of SRI’s key scientists in the early days of the remote viewing program Russell Targ, had initiated an FOIA request for all records involving himself and the subject of remote viewing.

During this time, Ingo Swann (SRI remote viewer and creator of CRV) had trained two people in his CRV techniques – one of these was Jim Schnabel. Schnabel was writing a book on remote viewing and also creating a documentary for channel 4 in the UK – which would later be aired on the Discovery Channel.

The fallout from this book/documentary was very serious at the time – FOIA documents indicate serious breaches of security from serving and ex serving members of the military remote viewing program, with former work colleagues informing on each other.

In a 1995 memorandum about the breaches of security, ED May (formerly of SRI and now of SIAC and director of the research side of the program) states in one memo:

“As, perhaps a very naïve scientist, I thought the papers I signed with regard to classified material were binding regardless of the content and age of the material and could only be released by formal protocol. Many of the individuals in this show appear to make a mockery of those agreements they, too had to sign. Some of the mentioned individuals are seeking private council with regard to legal action, given that the appropriate DIA authorities are seemingly unwilling to act.”

In my opinion, the outcome of all this momentum was that it was inevitable that military and intel remote viewing was going to be very public and potentially very messy. The best way to counter this momentum was to close the program. The idea was to show a credible story that went along the lines of, “we tried it and it didn’t work” – and diffuse the situation. And that’s what happened.

So where does all this leave us today?

Some of the ex-psychic spies now sell training in remote viewing from books, DVDs and even in person. There is a once a year annual get together of IRVA (International Remote Viewing Association) where old war stories and psychic exploits are shared. Ed Dames is still selling psychic tales of impending doom on national radio.

There are now thousands of ordinary people like myself honing this skill in the public domain across the globe. To what end – who knows. The rest I guess is yet to be written.

Article References:

->Reading the Enemy’s Mind: Inside Star Gate: America’s Psychic Espionage Program – Paul H smith
->Remote Viewers: The Secret History of America’s Psychic Spies – Jim Schnabel
->PSI Spies – Jim Marrs (early and later edition)
->Psychic Warrior : Inside the CIA’s Stargate Program – David Morehouse
->A review of the AIR report
->A second helping
->Scraps and crumbs
->Corrections
->An Assessment of the Evidence for Psychic Functioning
->Evaluation of Program on Anomalous Mental Phenomena
->Response to Ray Hymans Report
->A Commentary by Edwin C. May, Ph.D.

Note – You can purchase the entire released FOIA collection of CIA Star Gate archives (89,000 pages) at Stargate-Interactive.

Originally published on TopSecretWriters.com

  • Robertg

    It is useful to look back on the so called Remote Viewers and all their public pronouncements and predictions after the program supposedly fell apart.

    The point is absolutly nothing that these people, including Dames/Morehouse et al publicly stated ever came true, or amounted to anything.

    Things like the underground coloney of enitys from mars, to killer comets and everything else.

    All derived from remote viewing.

    All stories aside, they didn’t amount to anything but drival and speculation. I can understand why the program was canceled.

    These programs never amounted to a large sum of money either. Sure it was large by our standards, but by government, it was meaningless. With the Atomic Airplan in the 40s-early 60s the government spent billions of dollars to cancel the program.

    Summary: If the remote viewers said the sun was going to come up in the AM, don’t believe it until it happens!

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